prime, united, states, china

VIDEO shows car bomb tearing through Colombian military base, leaving at least 36 injured   -5%


Two large explosions rocked a military base and left dozens wounded in the Colombian city of Cucuta, the defense minister confirmed, calling the car bombing a “vile” act of terrorism.
Read Full Article at RT.com


Dominic Cummings claims: Rees-Mogg defends Hancock as 'successful genius'   -69%

But Labour's leader says the health secretary is "hopeless" - and the prime minister is just as bad.


Cuomo lifts pandemic-era restrictions as state hits 70 percent vax goal   -2%


Cuomo told a shoulder-to-shoulder, unmasked crowd at One World Trade Center on Tuesday that the state’s pandemic-era restrictions are no longer in effect "across commercial and social settings."


U.S. Says 'Contingency' Aid Ready If Russia Attacks Ukraine   -4%

The United States has prepared contingency military aid in the event of further Russian military incursions into Ukraine, the White House said on June 18.


China, Russia release roadmap for international lunar research station  

By Hu Zhe

BEIJING, June18 -- During the Global Space Exploration Conference 2021, China National Space Administration (CNSA) and Russian state space corporation Roscosmos jointly hosted the Global Network Forum on the roadmap for the creation of International Lunar Research Station (ILRS) on June 16th. The two sides jointly released the initial roadmap for the building of the ILRS and guidelines for cooperation partners.

In these papers, the scientific objectives, implementation approaches, and cooperation opportunity proposals of the ILRS were introduced, which will help the international partners to participate in the ILRS’s project planning, development, operation, future scientific research, etc. International partners are welcomed by China and Russia to participate in the project cooperation at all stages and levels.

With the progress of the ILRS project, China and Russia will release updated Roadmap and Guidelines for Partnership to further define the milestones of ILRS project in each stage, and release the procedures for the participation of partners in due course.

 


Four things to know about Michigan voters | Opinion   40%


A new poll by the Glengarrif Group offers a fascinating snapshot of our state

      


With Bezos at the Helm, Democracy Dies at the Washington Post Editorial Board   16%

In the Soviet Union, everybody was aware that the media was controlled by the state. But in a corporate state like the U.S., a veneer of independence is still maintained, although trust in the media has been plummeting for years.

The post With Bezos at the Helm, Democracy Dies at the Washington Post Editorial Board appeared first on MintPress News.


Saul B. Cohen, Who Helped Raise CUNY Standards, Dies at 95  

As president of Queens College and a state regent, Dr. Cohen, a renowned geographer, brokered a compromise to end the open admissions policy.


Chinese Wolf Warrior diplomat hits out at Europes military focus in Indo-Pacific   -2%


An outspoken Chinese diplomat has taken aim at the military focus of the EU and French Indo-Pacific strategies, but praised France and Germany for not being swayed by “anti-Chinese voices”.Lu Shaye, China’s ambassador to France, suggested European nations should instead seek to work with countries in the Indo-Pacific region.“We hope that the Indo-Pacific strategy of the European Union and France can promote cooperation with countries in the region, instead of using it as a strategy against…


China urges NATO to view China's development in rational manner  

BEIJING, June 15 -- A spokesperson for the Chinese Mission to the European Union (EU) on June 15 urged the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to view China's development in a rational manner and stop hyping up the so called "China threat" in any form.

The spokesperson made such remarks in response to a question regarding the communiqué issued by leaders of NATO members after the summit in Brussels on June 14, in which NATO claims China has presented “systemic challenges” to the rules-based international order and to areas relevant to NATO security, and also mentions issues including China's "coercive policies", rapidly expanding nuclear arsenal and "opaque" military modernization.

NATO's claim on the so-called "systemic challenges" posed by China is a slander of China's peaceful development and a misjudgment of the international situation and its own role, which represents a continuation of the Cold War mentality and bloc politics, said the spokesperson.

"China unwaveringly upholds a defense policy that's defensive in nature. Our pursuit of defense and military modernization is justified, reasonable, open and transparent."

The spokesperson pointed out that in 2021, China's national defense budget is RMB 1.35 trillion (about USD 209 billion), which accounts for just about 1.3% of its GDP, much lower than that of NATO. In comparison, the 30 NATO member states have an estimated total military expenditure of up to USD 1.17 trillion in 2021, accounting for more than half of the total across the world and 5.6 times that of China.

"The world sees clearly who has built military bases all over the world and whose aircraft carriers are flexing muscles everywhere," added the spokesperson.

As for the nuclear weapons, the spokesperson clearly stated that the number of China's nuclear weapons is by no means in the same league with NATO member states such as the United States. Statistics from think tanks in Sweden and the US show that NATO members have nearly 20 times as many nuclear warheads as China. China has always followed the principle of no-first-use of nuclear weapons at any time and under any circumstance, and committed itself unconditionally not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear-weapon states or nuclear-weapon-free zones.

The spokesperson stressed that China is committed to peaceful development, but will never forget the historical tragedy of the bombing of its embassy in Yugoslavia, leaving several Chinese dead and their families in unbearable pain.

"China will never give up our right to maintain peace and will firmly defend our sovereignty, security and development interests. We will closely watch NATO's strategic adjustment and its policy adjustment towards China. China will never pose 'systemic challenges' to anyone, neither will we sit idle if anyone dares to pose 'systemic challenges' to us."

The spokesperson sternly urged NATO to view China's development rationally, stop hyping all sorts of "China threat theories", and stop using China's legitimate interests and rights as the excuse to manipulate bloc politics, create confrontation and agitate geopolitical competition. NATO’s energy should be better spent on promoting dialogue and cooperation and doing things conducive to maintaining international and regional security and stability.

 


The Evangelical Politician Who Doesnt Recognize His FaithOr His Party   26%


Bill Haslam is not a natural fit for the Donald Trump–era Republican Party. The former Tennessee governor checks certain GOP boxes: He favors low taxes and opposes abortion rights; his background is in business, including an executive role in his family’s highly successful truck-stop chain. But during his time in office, Haslam also got in trouble with his base for vetoing a bill that would have declared the Bible Tennessee’s official state book. He successfully championed Tennessee Promise, the kind of free-college program you’d normally expect to hear about in a Bernie Sanders stump speech. And his temperament is a poor fit for Trump-style culture wars. When Haslam was elected during the 2010 Tea Party wave, a local commentator complained that “these other states have superhero action figures for their new governor, and we are stuck with Mr. Rogers.”

Historically, Tennessee has favored moderate candidates for statewide office. For many years, Democrats and Republicans rotated through the governor’s mansion, and since the mid-1990s, senators have tended to be centrist, business-minded Republicans. But like other red states, Tennessee seems to be swinging to the right: Trump won in 2020 by 23 percentage points, and the Republican margin of victory has consistently widened in every presidential election since 1996, the last time the state went to a Democrat. This hard-right trend leaves politicians like Haslam in an uncertain position. Although he declined to run for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat in 2020 and says he hasn’t figured out whether he’s going to run for office again, it’s also not clear that he could win in today’s political environment.

[Read: The evangelical reckoning begins]

Haslam is disturbed by some aspects of the national Republican Party’s recent direction—particularly the way politicians and activists have frequently used religion as a cudgel. In his new book, Faithful Presence, he laments what he describes as a tendency among Christians to conflate politics with faith. He is one of many religious conservatives who feel unsure how to describe themselves these days. While he firmly holds evangelical theological beliefs, he told me, he doesn’t feel like he fits the political image of evangelicalism at all. Haslam is willing to challenge his fellow Christians to be more Christ-like in the way they do politics, encouraging them to turn off Fox News and be more charitable toward their political opponents, but he’s squishy about naming and blaming fellow Christian political leaders for the example they’ve set. “There’s been damage to the Church by the identification with this political cause,” he said—the “cause” being Trumpism. But, he added, he’s not interested in criticizing “current political personalities.” Perhaps Haslam has another campaign in him, after all.

Our conversation has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

Emma Green: On January 6, when hundreds of rioters breached the United States Capitol, a number of them marched under flags that bore crosses and the names of God and Jesus. How do you think it is that we’ve come to a place in our country in which people who invaded the Capitol were doing so under the banner of Christianity?

Bill Haslam: That was a moment in our history that felt more than concerning. This is a place that I never thought we would be, and I hope we never are again. One of the reasons I wrote the book is this conflation of folks’ personal views of Christianity with their personal political views. This, to me, is a sign of how far off track the Church has gone.

Green: When you say off track, are you referring to pastors around the country—including in Nashville or elsewhere in Tennessee—who were telling their people, “Yes, you should storm the Capitol”?

Haslam: Well, I certainly never heard that in any of the churches I attended. But I have heard enough pastors who are saying they cannot believe the growth of the QAnon theory in their churches. Their churches had become battlegrounds over things that they never thought they would be. It’s not so much the pastors preaching that from pulpits—although I’m certain there’s some of that—but more people in the congregation who have become convinced that theories [such as QAnon] are reflective of their Christian faith.

[Read: A Christian insurrection]

Green: Why do you think it is that certain churches, especially those in a conservative, Protestant, evangelical environment, are particularly primed to have gotten off track in that way?

Haslam: I think it’s fear. A lot of people in churches look around and say, “The culture is changing so quickly.” As I heard one pastor say, it feels like we went from being the home team to the visiting team in one generation. People look around and say, “The culture is slipping away from us. We have to do something,” and they think we have to change that by political means.

Green: Do you resonate at all with the narrative that Christians are being pushed out of the public square?

Haslam: I actually would come at it the other way. Scripture says that if the meat has gone bad, it’s not the meat’s fault. It’s the salt’s fault. This is a moment for us to say, “If the salt’s lost that saltiness, how did that happen?” rather than drawing up battle lines against the other side.

Green: I’m never one to discount a good Sermon on the Mount riff, but just to translate that out of Christianese: How, exactly, do you hope Christians would demonstrate what it means to be a follower of Jesus in political life?

Haslam: [A line in the Epistle of] James says wisdom that’s from above is first pure, peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial, and sincere. Now, if you and I walked down Broadway in Nashville and we said, “Describe what Christians are like in the public square,” I don’t think we would get “pure, peaceable, and gentle.” We surely wouldn’t get “open to reason.” My point is, Christians are acting just like everyone else. We’re just as likely to send a nasty message on the internet. We’re just as likely to think we’ve won a battle because we have the most clever rhetoric on Twitter.

Green: You know, to be to be honest, one of the things that frustrated me about your book was that you lament this kind of bad behavior by Christians, but you don’t hold any leaders to account—particularly Republican leaders who are Christians and who hold their Christianity up as part of their politics—for insulting people on the internet and being nasty and showing poor leadership. Are there specific Republican leaders who you think bear responsibility for perpetuating that culture in the name of Christianity?

Haslam: I specifically did not want to make this a book about current political personalities. I think the issue is much bigger than our current situation. I also think it applies to people on both sides of the aisle. So while I understand your feeling, my point is that what’s needed is a more Christian approach to our public square, regardless of what your politics are.

Green: I definitely hear that. But I want to push back, because, as you know, the brand of evangelical Christianity—specifically white evangelical Christianity—has become so tightly tied to President Trump. Evangelicals supported him widely. They helped secure his victory. And he catered to them.

I just think the reality is that we’re in a place in our politics where, for people who don’t know that much about what it means to be a Christian, the first thing that pops into their head is Trump—including his way of treating other people. Do you think that evangelicals’ widespread support for President Trump has damaged the witness of the Church?

Haslam: I do think your question is fair. There have been a lot of people, particularly younger people, whom I’ve talked with who say, “If that’s what the Church is, then I don’t really want to be a part of it.” There’s been damage to the Church by the identification with this political cause—that’s really, really fair. But, again, how did we get here, where people who claim that their faith is the most important thing in their life are having their political actions look very different from what they say they believe? I think that’s a disease that can infect people from both parties.

Green: I want to ask you about the rightward trend in Tennessee politics. Historically, Tennessee switched back and forth between Democratic and Republican governors, and the state had a centrist temperament. But pretty clearly, in the past few years, the state has swung hard to the right. Why do you think a state like Tennessee has suddenly become a mirror of the national discourse, where temperatures run high and there’s quite a bit of angry right-wing sentiment?

Haslam: When I was elected in 2010, I was the first Republican governor in state history—since Reconstruction—to have Republican majorities in the legislature. We were a swing state. Then, over a period of time, the rural Tennessee voter moved from being a Democrat to being a Republican, and that voter brought some conservative social beliefs with them. What changed? Tennessee went from being a state where, to get elected, you had to win two elections—the general election and the primary—to a state where you just had to win the primary. So the type of person who got elected changed dramatically.

[Read: T. D. Jakes on how white evangelicals lost their way]

Green: You recently made the choice not to run for Lamar Alexander’s Senate seat, and it seems you’ve had a lot of opportunity to reflect on the road not taken. Bill Hagerty, the Republican who won that seat, joined Tennessee’s other senator, Marsha Blackburn, in an early effort to challenge the certification of the Electoral College in the 2020 election. (They both backed off after rioters attacked the Capitol.) I have to think you wouldn’t have done the same. Did you watch what they did and say, “Man, I wish I had run for that Senate seat”?

Haslam: [Laughs] No. I really haven’t had a moment’s regret about not running for the Senate.

Green: Did you call up Senator Blackburn or Senator Hagerty and encourage them to step back from those efforts?

Haslam: I did not. No. I have a view on ex-politicians giving advice: Wait until asked, unless something feels like a moment of crisis that I have some insight into that no one else has.

Green: And you didn’t feel that January 6 was one of those moments of crisis?

Haslam: Well, I think January 6 was a moment of crisis and was a seminal moment in the country’s history. I just don’t think at that point in time I had any insight that anyone else didn’t have. If I have a really strong opinion but I’m another one of 6.6 million Tennesseans, is it my role to jump in and tell the sitting governor or a sitting senator “Here’s what you should do on that”? I don’t see that being my role.

Green: The reason why I’m pressing you on it is that it comes back to the whole point of your book. You feel strongly that Christians should be modeling a certain type of affect and leadership in politics. You’re not one of 6.6 million Tennesseans—there aren’t that many former governors of the state bopping around. You’ve built up all of this capital in the state. You still have credibility in the Republican Party. If this isn’t the moment to take your shot, when would it be?

Haslam: Well, I think that’s a good question. But again, in that moment, if this person understands both sides of the argument and they’re making one choice, I don’t think it’s my role to go in and overrule them.

Green: All right. I want to talk a little bit about the future of Tennessee. One interesting phenomenon in the 2020 election was looking next door to Georgia and seeing how a state with a booming, growing metropolitan area basically swung the state to the Democratic side. I know there are Republicans, particularly in Nashville, who see outsiders pouring in faster than the city can handle and are thinking, We could be the next Georgia. I wonder if you think Tennessee Republicans are facing a challenge in the coming years with demographic changes happening in the state?

Haslam: That’s a great question. I should start by saying that my record as a crystal-ball predictor is pretty bad. You would not want me to go to Las Vegas and make political bets.

Green: I’ll make a note of that.

Haslam: I’d say I have two observations. One of the things I’ve noticed in Tennessee is that a lot of the folks who are moving here are actually more conservative than the people who were here to begin with. We have a lot of people coming here from California and Illinois and New Jersey and New York, and they specifically came for a very different type of environment—a state with low taxes. Don’t assume that new people from traditionally liberal areas will make the state more liberal.

My second point, though, would be to agree with your premise. Republicans did a good job in the last election of reaching out to more rural voters. They even attracted a lot of people who haven’t been heavy voters in the past. What we lost was a lot of the suburban voters—particularly the female suburban voters. As a party, we’re trading high-propensity voters for low-propensity voters. That’s a concern for the Republican Party in Tennessee, and everywhere else for that matter.

Green: You seem to be open to being in politics at some point in the future, and in your book, you’re trying to get at this huge, challenging problem of shifting the way Christians approach politics—including people in your party. So what are you going to do with your days?

Haslam: You sound like my wife! I honestly don’t know the answer to that question. I really did love being a mayor and love being a governor. But as I told you, I’ve had zero minutes of regret about not running for the Senate. I don’t know that I will run for office again. I might. But I certainly don’t have a plan to do that anytime soon.

Green: Well, you know, the only executive office that’s a bump up from governor is president.

Haslam: I didn’t know that. Thank you.


Local party boss found dead and five organisers arrested after Chinese ultramarathon tragedy   10%


The provincial authorities in northwest China have confirmed that a local party chief has died and five people have been arrested as the fallout over the deaths of 21 runners in an ultramarathon last month continued.The death by suicide of Li Zuobi, the Jingtai county party chief, was made public on Friday when Gansu provincial officials announced the results of an investigation into last month’s tragedy. They also said five members of the company which organised the Yellow River Stone Forest…


Chinas space station launch in pictures   16%


A Chinese spaceship carrying a three-person crew has docked with the country’s new space station at the start of three-month mission, marking a milestone in its ambitious space programme. The mission is China’s first manned spaceflight in almost five years

Continue reading...


Ashes of Hideki Tojo, Japan's Wartime Leader, Were Secretly Scattered at Sea   -20%


The location of the remains of the wartime Japanese prime minister had been a puzzle. Now, documents reveal that U.S. forces secretly scattered his ashes into the Pacific Ocean.


An internet outage affects company websites in Australia and beyond.  


Analysts said the glitch was caused by service disruptions at a hosting platform, Akamai, based in the United States.


The Daily 202: Heres how Juneteenth looks outside the Beltway  

Forty-nine states and Washington, D.C. celebrate the holiday.


'We'd rather sacrifice our lives than lose an inch of territory,' Galwan Valley hero appears at high-level military honorary meeting   16%



Photo:CCTV

Qi Fabao, the regimental commander from the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Xinjiang military command, who suffered serious head injury while fighting bravely in the Galwan Valley border skirmish on June 15, 2020, made an appearance and spoke at a recent high-level military meeting in honor of heroic border troops on Friday. As the first anniversary of the skirmish approaches, experts say China has once again shown its determination to safeguard territorial integrity.

According to the video clip from the military channel of China Central Television (CCTV) on Thursday, Qi, in military uniform with a Party emblem on, attended a meeting organized by the Political Work Department of the Central Military Commission. The scar in his head can be clearly seen.

Along with four other frontline soldiers, Qi shared the stories of four martyrs who sacrificed their lives in the Galwan Valley clash.

"If the troop is compared to a sharp sword, then the courage and uprightness of soldiers is the blade of the sword. We are not afraid of sacrifice, and we have always held on to the belief that we would rather sacrifice our lives than lose an inch of our territory," Qi said in his speech.

Qian Feng, director of the research department at the National Strategy Institute at Tsinghua University, told the Global Times on Friday that Qi's speech in the briefing showed China's consistent and firm attitude of safeguarding sovereignty and territorial integrity.

India should not have any illusion that China will make any concession on the issue of territorial integrity, said Qian, noting that the two countries should respect each other and meet halfway to restore peace and tranquility on the border and create conditions for the restart of China-India relations.

The skirmish in June 2020 was caused by India's provocation, and Chinese frontline soldiers have demonstrated their spirit of never giving up an inch of territory in safeguarding national sovereignty and territorial integrity, Song Zhongping, a military expert and TV commentator, told the Global Times on Friday.

The briefing that highlighted heroes can also been seen as a patriotic and national defense education for the Chinese public before the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China on July 1 and China's Army Day on August 1, the expert said.

The event can make the whole society understand the importance of the military, which needs greater respect, as they are protecting China's core interests with their blood and lives, Song said.

In February, the Central Military Commission issued commendations to the servicemen for their role in bravely fighting back provocations by foreign forces at the Galwan Valley. The title of "border-defending hero" was conferred on Battalion Commander Chen Hongjun posthumously, while Chen Xiangrong, Xiao Siyuan and Wang Zhuoran received first-class merits. They all died in a Galwan Valley clash last June, Xinhua reported.

In May, the CPC Central Committee announced that they will, for the first time, issue July 1 Medals to Party members who have made outstanding contributions and created valuable spiritual wealth. The 29 candidates recommended for the award included Chen Hongjun, a Galwan Valley hero who died in the clash last year.

 


'Wrong Decision': Ukrainian Woman Regrets Time In Syria As She Returns Home   7%

A Ukrainian woman and her seven children have been repatriated from Syria, where they were being held by regional authorities in a camp for people said to have links to the Islamic State extremist group. She has admitted being married to a member of the organization and describes her journey to Syria in 2014 as a mistake which she regrets.


Court orders California to move severely disabled defendants into treatment within 28 days   -22%


A state appeals court has given the state a deadline for moving defendants deemed incompetent to stand trial into treatment. They now languish in jail for months before they get help.


Armenia: Opposition Kocharyan's supporters rally before snap polls   8%

Supporters of former President Robert Kocharyan, Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan's main rival, have gathered as Armenia braces for early parliamentary elections.


Translation: Two Families Shattered by a Patriotic Youth   -8%

This spring, while nationalist fervor to “support Xinjiang cotton” swelled online, voices in China calling to “support Xinjiang people“—fellow Chinese citizens targeted by China’s “anti-terrorism” campaign in the region—were often silenced. The boycott of H&M and other foreign clothing brands pledging not to source cotton from Xinjiang has largely stayed online, but recalls earlier nationalist […]


Record number of women in new Israeli cabinet: Meet the ministers   -10%

These nine women ministers hold widely divergent backgrounds, values and policy priorities


Photos of the Week: Mouse Hunter, Lake Jumper, Sunset Hiker   5%


Dia Dipasupil / Getty for Tribeca Festival

Fancy hats at the Royal Ascot, a ring-tailed lemur in Chile, a derailed train in Mexico, a rocket launch in China, military exercises in Morocco, rhythmic gymnastics in Bulgaria, a sea lion in California, protests at the G7 summit in England, and much more


Brexit deal risks undermining N.Ireland peace, says UK's Frost  

The historic U.S.-brokered 1998 Irish peace agreement has been put at risk by the implementation of the Brexit divorce deal in the British province of Northern Ireland, Prime Minister Boris Johnson's top Brexit negotiator said on Wednesday.


Chinese astronauts enter core module of future space station in historic first for Beijing   -2%


Three Chinese astronauts have entered the core module of the country’s future space station in a crucial step towards its completion, the Chinese Foreign Ministry has announced.
Read Full Article at RT.com


Spain set to bid adios to mandatory masks outdoors from June 26  


The Spanish prime minister has announced that the law on mandatory mask-wearing outdoors is to be lifted next Saturday, June 26, as Spain’s vaccination campaign makes rapid progress.
Read Full Article at RT.com


UN calls for halt of weapons to Myanmar after 119 countries vote to support resolution  


The United Nations General Assembly on Friday called for a stop to the flow of arms to Myanmar and urged the military to respect November election results and release political detainees, including leader Aung San Suu Kyi.The General Assembly adopted a resolution with the support of 119 countries some four months after the military overthrew Aung San Suu Kyi’s elected government in a coup. Belarus requested the text be put to a vote and was the only country to oppose it, while 36 abstained,…


Netanyahu Opponents Celebrate at Tel Aviv Rally  


People thronged Rabin Square, cheering over the removal of a divisive prime minister, but worrying about the new one.


Victoria requests more ADF support for storm clean-up   -6%

The Victorian government is set to ask the Commonwealth to send more Australian Defence Force members to assist with clearing roads and doorknocking after a deadly storm lashed the state last week.


Nigeria: Edo 2020 - Governor Diri Splashes N195 Million On Team Bayelsa   80%

[This Day] Bayelsa State Governor, Senator Douye Diri, has generously rewarded athletes that made the state proud at the National Sports Festival held in April this year in Edo State.


Eyebrows raised as China tightens grip on its financial markets   25%

China is resorting to increasingly forceful measures to contain risks to the financial system, in moves that threaten to undermine President Xi Jinping’s pledge to give markets greater freedom.


Dead murder hornet near Seattle is first found in US this year   11%


Entomologists say it’s first confirmed report from Snohomish county and seems to be unrelated to 2019 and 2020 discoveries

Scientists have found a dead Asian giant hornet north of Seattle, the first so-called murder hornet found in the country this year, federal and state investigators said Wednesday.

Entomologists from the state and US Agriculture departments said it’s the first confirmed report from Snohomish county, north of Seattle, and appears to be unrelated to the 2019 and 2020 findings of the hornets in Canada and Whatcom county, along the Canadian border, that gained widespread attention.

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China and Russia ready to shoot for the moon with ambitious research station plans   -22%


China and Russia have unveiled details of their plans for a joint research station on the moon, with at least five structures on the surface slated for completion by 2035, reviving an international space race three decades after the Cold War.The China National Space Agency (CNSA) and its Russian counterpart Roscosmos agreed in March to develop the International Lunar Research Station (ILRS), with an invitation to other countries to join the programme.The plan is to develop comprehensive…


Voting ends in Irans presidential election after two-hour extension amid low turnout  


Polling stations in Iran’s presidential election closed early Saturday after around nineteen hours of voting, the official IRNA state news agency reported.“The election officially ended at 2:00 am


China prepares to launch Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship   -6%


The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket is being transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

JIUQUAN, June 9 (Xinhua) -- The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday.

The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA.


The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket is being transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket is being transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

Photo shows the combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket after it was transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket is being transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

Photo shows the combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket after it was transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket is being transferred to the launching area of Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, June 9, 2021. The combination of the Shenzhou-12 manned spaceship and a Long March-2F carrier rocket has been transferred to the launching area, the China Manned Space Agency (CMSA) said Wednesday. The facilities and equipment at the launch site are in good condition, and various pre-launch function checks and joint tests will be carried out as planned, said the CMSA. (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua)

 


China antitrust: Didis ride hailing dominance prompts scrutiny before it sets forth for its Uber-beating New York IPO   8%


In the third instalment of a four-part series on China’s antitrust crackdown on technology companies, Masha Borak looks at the ride-hailing industry and its dominant operator Didi-Chuxing. The first instalment on streaming music is here and the second instalment on games is here. On April 30, the day before China was to begin a five-day stretch of public holidays to mark the annual Labour Day, 10 of the country’s largest technology companies were each slapped with a financial penalty by the…


China gets closer to space goals but threat to US more of a theory than a reality   8%


China’s space ambitions are starting to take shape after it sent three astronauts into orbit to complete work on its first space station. It marks a new phase in the country’s space race with rival the United States, but analysts say China still has a way to go to catch up.The Chinese astronauts will spend three months on the Tianhe module – the first part of the Tiangong space station – after they blasted off from the Gobi Desert in the Shenzhou-12 spacecraft on Thursday.It was China’s first…


US-Canada border restrictions extended until July 21  


Canada’s public safety minister says border restrictions on nonessential travel with the United States will be extended until July 21


Texas Dems amp up voting rights pressure with D.C. blitz  


Democratic state legislators in Texas are heading to Washington for meetings with Congress and the White House after blocking a GOP elections bill last month.


Virus absolutely still out there as Victoria records one new COVID-19 case   14%

Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton said he was “optimistic” the state was on the right track for more easing of restrictions next week, but said health officials needed time to assess the effect of loosened restrictions.