national security

TikTok to quit Hong Kong after India ban and US threats to outlaw app  


Decision comes amid new national security law that requires apps hand over people's private data


TikTok stops working leading users to panic that it has been banned  


The Trump administration has said it is looking into the app due to national security concerns


Hong Kong activist Nathan Law moves to Britain and vows fight will continue   36%


Law fled his home after Beijing’s introduction of the national security law that punishes anti-China sentiment

Nathan Law, one of Hong Kong’s most prominent young democracy activists, announced has relocated to Britain, five days after confirming he had fled his home because of Beijing’s new security law.

“My destination: London,” Law wrote in a Facebook post on Monday, his 27th birthday.

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Hong Kong activist Nathan Law says he fled city   15%

Law said he fled overseas due to Beijing's national security law imposed on the city. His announcement came as the local government made one of the most popular slogans of the city's pro-democracy protests illegal.


Like coronavirus fight, time for Hong Kong to adapt to national security law   13%


The national security law for Hong Kong has been written in such a way that what exactly constitutes a violation isn’t clear. Beijing wants it like that to ensure we are apprehensive about what we say and do.We know the penalties, though, so the effect of the uncertainty is that those among us who feel righteous indignation at having freedoms curtailed may be tempted to hold their tongues. The dilemma then is how do we express discontent, protect our rights and ensure what is guaranteed by the…


EU foreign ministers debate responses to Hong Kong national security law  


In a sign of escalating tensions with Beijing, the European Union on Monday vowed to “stand by the people of Hong Kong” and discussed ways to provide them with tailor-made visa schemes, warning of a “revision” of diplomatic course with China following the national security law.Calling the new law “draconian”, the EU said it would propose a package of measures within days – some against the Hong Kong authorities, others in support of Hongkongers who plan to leave the city.Since imposing the law…


In Trump, China has an adversary whos not afraid to push back even if it means economic pain   10%


Some of the Chinese government’s recent policies seem to make little practical sense, with its decision to impose a national security law on Hong Kong being a prime example. The law’s rushed enactment by the National People’s Congress effectively ends the “one country, two systems” model that has prevailed since 1997, when the city was returned from British to Chinese rule, and tensions between China and the West have increased sharply.   Hong Kong’s future as an international financial centre…


Pope strays from script to avoid mention of Hong Kong in Sunday address   11%


Pope Francis did not mention Hong Kong in his regular noon address on Sunday, despite a paragraph on his concerns for the city’s religious freedoms in the wake of a new national security law appearing in the original script.According to an embargoed copy of the Angelus address, seen and confirmed by the South China Morning Post, the missing paragraph expressed the Pope’s “attention and worries” about Hong Kong’s social and religious freedoms.His decision to omit mention of the city has stirred…


Chinas home security chief attends Hong Kong national security office opening  


China’s head of home security law enforcement was present at the opening of Beijing’s national security office in Hong Kong on Wednesday, sources said.Chen Siyuan, assistant public security minister, attended the opening of the Office for Safeguarding National Security but did not deliver any official speech.After the ceremony, he joined Zheng Yanxiong, director of the new office, and the two deputy directors, Li Jiangzhou and Sun Qingye, as well as Ma Yinming, its disciplinary head and a…


Hongkongers, spooked by Beijings new national security law, are scrubbing their digital footprints   27%


Sam Wong remembers exactly when he deleted his Facebook account.An hour before the clock struck midnight on July 1, Hong Kong officially adopted a new national security law imposed by Beijing. Like many others living in the city, Wong only learned about the full details of the sweeping legislation after it was signed into law. By the time it came into force, he decided that the moment had come for him to quit the social media platform.The social service manager in his early 30s, who spoke under…


How Hong Kong national security law compares to legislation in other countries   10%


China’s decision to write up and enact a national security law for Hong Kong was welcomed by city leaders, rejected by protesters, and met with incredulity by some legal authorities, with one remarking that it seemed to apply to “everyone on the planet”. But how does it compare to similar laws elsewhere? National security laws seek to strike a balance between public freedoms and protecting a country, while also shifting in focus as perceived threats change, legal scholars say. Such a shift…


China Ministry of Public Security backs Hong Kong police in rolling out national security law   11%


China’s Ministry of Public Security has pledged to “direct and support” the Hong Kong police to punish crimes against national security, in its first comments on the city’s new national security law since it came into effect.“[We] must direct Hong Kong’s police to stop the violence and curb disorder … to prevent, stop and punish the crimes and behaviours by an extremely small group of people who endanger national security,” the ministry’s leadership was quoted as saying in a post on the…


Immigration firms report rush of Hong Kong BN(O) renewal interest  


Immigration lawyers and consultants say more Hongkongers are applying to renew their British National (Overseas) passports as a national security law comes into effect in the city.Colin Bloomfield, chief executive of immigration service British Connections in Hong Kong, said there had been a "sudden surge in applications from people looking to renew their expired or lost BN(O) passports” after Britain announced a pathway to citizenship for holders of the documents on Wednesday.London-based…


Beijings surprise choice to spearhead the national security law in Hong Kong   5%


Beijing surprised even insiders by picking a veteran Guangdong official, instead of a senior officer from the mainland’s law enforcement or intelligence apparatus, to head the all-powerful agency overseeing the enforcement of the national security law in Hong Kong.But mainland analysts studying Hong Kong affairs said the appointment of Zheng Yanxiong, former secretary general of the Guangdong Communist Party committee, showed that President Xi Jinping wanted a hardliner familiar with propaganda…


Central gov't office for safeguarding national security in Hong Kong inaugurated   11%


The Office for Safeguarding National Security of the Central People's Government in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is inaugurated in Hong Kong, south China, July 8, 2020. (Xinhua/Lui Siu Wai)

According to the national security law for the HKSAR, the office analyzes and assesses developments related to safeguarding national security in the HKSAR, provides opinions and makes proposals on major strategies and important policies, and oversees, guides, coordinates with and supports the HKSAR in assuming the duties for safeguarding national security.

HONG KONG, July 8 (Xinhua) -- The Office for Safeguarding National Security of the Central People's Government in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) was inaugurated here on Wednesday morning.

The office was established in accordance with the Law of the People's Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, which was adopted by China's top legislature and promulgated in the HKSAR on June 30.

According to the national security law, the office analyzes and assesses developments related to safeguarding national security in the HKSAR, provides opinions and makes proposals on major strategies and important policies, and oversees, guides, coordinates with and supports the HKSAR in assuming the duties for safeguarding national security.

The office also collects and analyzes intelligence and information about national security and handles cases on offenses endangering national security.


Implementation rules for Article 43 of national security law in HKSAR take effect   35%

HONG KONG, July 7 (Xinhua) -- The Implementation Rules for Article 43 of the Law of the People's Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) take effect on Tuesday, the HKSAR government said when the implementation rules were gazetted on Monday evening.

Article 43 of the national security law stipulates various measures that the department for safeguarding national security of the Police Force of the HKSAR may take when handling cases concerning offence endangering national security, and authorizes the HKSAR chief executive, in conjunction with the Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the HKSAR (National Security Committee) to make relevant implementation rules for the purpose of applying the measures stipulated under Article 43.

At the first meeting of the National Security Committee on Monday, the chief executive, in conjunction with the National Security Committee, exercised the power under Article 43 of the national security law to make relevant implementation rules for law enforcement agencies such as the department for safeguarding national security of the Hong Kong Police Force to implement the measures stipulated under Article 43, the HKSAR government said in a statement.

The implementation rules provide for rules that relevant officers should observe when carrying out the specific measures concerned to prevent, suppress and impose punishment for offences endangering national security, and relevant offences and penalties for the effective implementation of the measures, so as to improve the enforcement mechanisms for the HKSAR to safeguard national security.

An HKSAR government spokesman pointed out that the implementation rules, formulated for the exercise of various measures by relevant officers, clearly set out in detail the procedural requirements, circumstances that must be met and conditions for approval when implementing those measures.

The purpose is to ensure that when relevant officers exercise powers and apply measures under Article 43 of the national security law to enforce the law, the objectives of preventing, suppressing and imposing punishment for any acts and activities endangering national security can be achieved, while the requirement under the general principles of the national security law to respect and protect human rights, as well as the protection of various rights and freedom in accordance with the law can be complied with.

The implementation rules include search of places for evidence by law enforcement officers and related agencies; restriction on persons under investigation from leaving Hong Kong; freezing, restraint, confiscation and forfeiture of property related to offences endangering national security; removal of messages endangering national security and request for assistance; requiring political organizations and agents of foreign countries and China's Taiwan to provide information on activities concerning Hong Kong; application on authorization for interception of communications and covert surveillance; requirement to furnish information and produce materials.

The HKSAR government representatives will brief members of the Legislative Council of the HKSAR on the content of the national security law and the implementation rules.


Chinese ambassador shares "1 to 9" facts on national security law for Hong Kong   3%

WASHINGTON, July 3 (Xinhua) -- Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai on Friday shared basic facts and his viewpoints on the newly enacted national security law for Hong Kong through a video message by using the numbers "1 to 9."

He said that "1 and 2" means "one country, two systems."

This will remain the basic guideline for the governance of Hong Kong. The adoption of the law is a milestone in the practice of "one country, two systems" and will provide a strong institutional guarantee for its long-term implementation, the Chinese ambassador said.

"With 3, I mean 3 million here. A signature campaign to endorse the law was initiated in Hong Kong late May. Within eight days, almost 3 million Hong Kong residents signed online or at street stands to show their support. The law is what the people really want," he said.

The number 4 refers to the four offences and their corresponding penalties prescribed in the law, namely secession, subversion, terrorist activities, collusion with foreign countries or external elements to endanger national security, he said.

The number 5 stands for five decades. According to the Basic Law of Hong Kong, its capitalist system and way of life shall remain unchanged for 50 years, Cui said.

"With 6, I mean the six chapters and 66 articles of the law. I would advise you to read the whole law thoroughly and carefully, so as to avoid any misunderstanding or the influence of biases," he said.

The numbers 7 and 8 stand for the over 7 million Hong Kong residents and over 80,000 American citizens living in Hong Kong. The national security law will help ensure the restoration of social order in the city, and this is absolutely good news for all of them, the ambassador said.

In the Chinese culture, 9 often means "long-lasting," Cui said, adding he has full confidence that the national security law will ensure the long-term stability and prosperity of Hong Kong.

As Hong Kong belongs to China, Hong Kong affairs are definitely China's domestic affairs. The Chinese government and people are fully determined to safeguard national sovereignty, security and development interests, and to oppose external interference in Hong Kong affairs, Cui said.


Committee for Safeguarding National Security of HKSAR established   35%


A ship carrying the slogan of "celebrating the passage of the Law of the People's Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR)" sails at the Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong, China, July 1, 2020. (Xinhua/Lui Siu Wai)
 

Lau Chi-wai was sworn in as the deputy commissioner of police and the head of the department of the Hong Kong Police Force for safeguarding national security.

HONG KONG, July 3 (Xinhua) -- The Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) was established on Friday as required by the national security law, a HKSAR government spokesperson said.

In accordance with stipulations of the Law of the People's Republic of China on Safeguarding National Security in the HKSAR, the committee is chaired by the HKSAR chief executive Carrie Lam.

Lau Chi-wai, on the nomination by Lam, was sworn in as the deputy commissioner of police and the head of the department of the Hong Kong Police Force for safeguarding national security.

Members of the committee include the Chief Secretary for Administration, the Financial Secretary, the Secretary for Justice, the Secretary for Security, the Commissioner of Police, the Deputy Commissioner of Police, the Director of Immigration, the Commissioner of Customs and Excise and the Director of the Chief Executive's Office.

On Thursday, the director of the chief executive's office Chan Kwok-ki was sworn in as the secretary general of the Committee for Safeguarding National Security of the HKSAR.

 


Translation: Even Without a Security Law, Authorities Have a Million Methods   55%

On June 30, hours after Xi Jinping signed Hong Kong’s national security law in Beijing, authorities in the territory hastily implemented the controversial legislation.


The new Hong Kong: Disappearing books, illegal words and arrests over blank white paper   -16%


Less than two weeks under a new national security law enacted by Beijing, Hong Kong residents already feel a curtain of control falling over the city's realms of speech and thought.


US Congress unanimously votes for 'Hong Kong Autonomy Act' to sanction China-linked banks  

The U.S. Senate unanimously approved legislation on Thursday to penalize banks doing business with Chinese officials who implement Beijing's draconian new national security law on Hong Kong, sending it to the White House for President Donald Trump's signature.


Banks in Hong Kong nervously eye US sanctions   -44%

Banks in Hong Kong are urgently auditing their clients to identify who could be impacted by new US sanctions. Hong Kong's national security law makes it illegal to comply with US sanctions, so some businesses could face the tough choice of doing business with either China or the United States. Meanwhile, TikTok pulls out of Hong Kong on a matter of principle over freedom of speech concerns, as part of a broader effort by the company to distance itself from its Chinese roots.


Google, Facebook among tech firms suspending Hong Kong requests for user data  

US-based technology giants including Google, Facebook and Twitter have temporarily stopped processing requests from Hong Kong authorities for access to user data, after Beijing's new national security law was implemented. The new rules could see employees of companies which don't comply with the rules face up to six months in prison. Meanwhile, the Chinese-owned video platform TikTok has gone one step further, announcing it will pull its app from download stores in Hong Kong as a result of the measures.