michael bloomberg

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Bloombergs #MeToo Problem   -2%


« TODAY IN POLITICS »

(Scott Morgan / Reuters)

Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former New York City mayor, is reportedly considering a presidential run.

But rather than propelling him to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, a Bloomberg campaign could force a reckoning over a long history of allegations about the ways in which he—or his namesake company—have undermined women.

Bloomberg hasn’t really faced accountability. My colleague Megan Garber, who offers a clear voice in the tangled era of #MeToo, wrote last year about Bloomberg’s history:

These reports suggest the extent of the blind spot. They also suggest, however, the expansive underbelly of #MeToo: the easy entitlements by which men come to see women as existing in part for their pleasure. The stories told of Bloomberg paint a picture of self-centric power, of moral tautologies, of limited empathies.

Despite this recent flurry of activity, Bloomberg may yet decide to forgo a 2020 bid; in fact, when it comes to running for president, he has a penchant for crying wolf.

For a decade, the centrist billionaire has played a game of almost running, and then vowing that he’ll definitely not run. In March 2010, for example, The Wall Street Journal reported that Bloomberg was laying the groundwork for a 2012 run. A few months later, Bloomberg told Katie Couric that he was “not going to run for president, period, End of story.”

My colleague David Graham has this very short, but very fun, history on the will-he-or-won’t-he.

Let’s just say Bloomberg is for real this time around. How would his presence affect the race? He may want to be the candidate to block lefty firebrands like Elizabeth Warren from the nomination, but that plan could easily backfire, Peter Beinart argues. Instead, the rumors might be music to Warren’s ears, giving her another billionaire opponent to set herself against on the campaign trail.

Saahil Desai

« WEEKEND READ »

(Todd St. John)

What’s the role of the artist in the age of Trump?

Lin-Manuel Miranda (yes, Lin-Manuel Miranda of Hamilton fame) has an essay in our upcoming December issue on the undeniable power of art.

At the end of the day, our job as artists is to tell the truth as we see it. If telling the truth is an inherently political act, so be it. Times may change and politics may change, but if we do our best to tell the truth as specifically as possible, time will reveal those truths and reverberate beyond the era in which we created them. We keep revisiting Shakespeare’s Macbeth because ruthless political ambition does not belong to any particular era. We keep listening to Public Enemy because systemic racism continues to rain tragedy on communities of color. We read Orwell’s 1984 and shiver at its diagnosis of doublethink, which we see coming out of the White House at this moment. And we listen to Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific, as Lieutenant Cable sings about racism, “You’ve got to be carefully taught.” It’s all art. It’s all political.

Read his full essay here.

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« ABOUT US »

Today’s edition of our daily newsletter of political ideas and arguments was written by Saahil Desai and edited by Shan Wang.

Comments, questions, or even reading recommendations for us? Reply directly to this newsletter, or email politicsdaily@theatlantic.com. See you tomorrow.

Your support makes our journalism possible. Subscribe here.


The Atlantic Politics Daily: Trump All By Himself  


It’s Thursday, November 7. The president of Turkey will visit the White House next week, one month after the Syria chaos. Michael Bloomberg has reportedly taken steps to enter the Democratic presidential primary.

In today’s newsletter: ¶ People. Trump dining alone; Rudy Giuliani. ¶ Places. Capitol Hill.  ¶ Things. Warren’s wealth tax.

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« TODAY IN POLITICS »

(Brendan Smialowwski / Getty)

Trump is dealing with impeachment—and the presidency—all by himself.

“He just has no life,” one person close to President Trump recently told our White House reporter Peter Nicholas.

“It’s all politics, all the time,” one former Trump White House official told him. “And that can be warping to anybody.”

Since the impeachment inquiry ramped up, Peter has been reporting out concerns both current Trump associates and former White House aides have had about how the president is handling things in the White House.

His latest reporting paints a picture of president unraveling fast, and a diminished staff around him:

It’s not just “adults in the room” (e.g., Jim Mattis, John Kelly). Many confidants have departed, including two of his closest aides, former communications director Hope Hicks and former press secretary Sarah Sanders.

Those still in the administration are focused on their own survival—or ambitions. Trump has an acting chief of staff (Mick Mulvaney) who is already on the outs, a secretary of state who hasn’t ruled out a Senate run in Kansas, a Vice President who’s popular with the GOP establishment on the Hill.

Read Peter’s full report here.

Christian Paz

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« ARGUMENTS AND IDEAS »

(ANDREW HARNIK / AP)

Why hasn’t Trump thrown Rudy Giuliani under the bus?

In keeping with the theme of people who aren’t doing Trump any favor: David Graham asks why Trump doesn’t consciously uncouple with America’s Mayor.

To cut him off, he’d have to acknowledge that Giuliani was doing something improper, and the president has refused to admit that anything in the Ukraine scandal was inappropriate.

Read David’s argument here.

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« WHAT OUR POLITICS TEAM IS READING »

With what looks like a political upset in the Kentucky governor’s race this week, I was fascinated by this piece on the conservative activist group that poured money into the state focusing on areas of conflict over transgender rights, such as bathroom use and school sports. It’s not clear what conclusions they’ll draw from Republican Governor Matt Bevin’s apparent loss, but this may be a sign of what's to come in races ahead.
—Emma Green, a staff writer who covers religion and politics

I was struck by this piece by my colleague Uri Friedman. The story detailed the confusion surrounding the Trump administration’s policy in Ukraine. It also vividly illustrated the danger of conducting diplomacy through presidential loyalists focused on Trump's political interests.
—Peter Nicholas

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« EVENING READ »

(ProPublica Illinois)

This is life in one of the whitest towns in Illinois.

Logan Jaffe, a reporter with ProPublica Illinois, revisits a “sundown town” with a long history of discrimination against black people.

I took a seat at the bar. A man two stools over from me struck up a conversation. I told him I was a journalist from Chicago and asked him to tell me about this town. “You know how this town is called Anna?” he started. “That’s for ‘Ain’t No Niggers Allowed.’” He laughed, shook his head, and took a sip of his beer.

Read the full story.

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« Before You Go »

(Michael Cohen / Getty)

What does Bill Gates get right and wrong about Elizabeth Warren’s wealth tax? Ian Bogost evaluates Gates’ $100 billion tax complaint:

This is a duplicitous way to talk about Warren’s proposal, because taxing $100 billion out of $106.8 billion would amount to a 94 percent tax; Warren has proposed an annual 3 percent wealth tax on assets over $1 billion.

Read the full analysis.

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« ABOUT US »

Today’s edition of our daily newsletter of political ideas and arguments was written by Christian Paz and edited by Shan Wang.

Comments, questions, or even reading recommendations for us? Reply directly to this newsletter, or email politicsdaily@theatlantic.com. See you tomorrow.

Your support makes our journalism possible. Subscribe here.


Bloomberg faces big challenges if he leaps into 2020 White House race   20%

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has the money and name recognition to shake up the Democratic presidential race, but he will face huge hurdles to the nomination if he makes the leap to become a formal candidate.


Billionaires fear Warren and Sanders but they should fear us all | Robert Reich   -5%


Wealth tax plans make sense but proper regulation could also cut Bezos, Dimon, Cohen and Neumann down to size

Billionaires are wailing that wealth tax proposals by Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are attacks on free-market capitalism.

Related: Michael Bloomberg: billionaire eyes centre lane in Democratic presidential race

Continue reading...


'I would love to go': Trump considers Putin invite to Russia video  


Donald Trump has said he is considering attending a Russian military parade in May, claiming he has been invited by the Russian president, Vladimir Putin. The US president spoke to reporters on the White House lawn, where he also talked about Michael Bloomberg entering the Democratic primary. 'He’s not going to do well, but I think he’s going to hurt Biden actually … There’s nobody I’d rather run against than little Michael,' he said

Continue reading...


Warren and Booker lead candidates at environmental justice forum   2%


  • National Black Caucus of State Legislators hosts event
  • Booker defends support for nuclear power

Only six candidates turned out for the first ever presidential forum on environmental justice at South Carolina State University on Friday night.

Related: Michael Bloomberg: billionaire eyes centre lane in Democratic presidential race

Continue reading...


Michael Bloomberg for president? Billionaire keeps options open with bid for Democratic primary in Alabama   13%


Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has the money and name recognition to shake up the Democratic presidential race, but he will face huge hurdles to the nomination if he makes the leap to become a formal candidate.The billionaire media mogul is laying the groundwork for a possible candidacy in the 2020 US presidential election and kept his options open by filing paperwork on Friday to run in the Democratic primary in Alabama, which has an early deadline for ballot qualification.The…


Ex-New York mayor Michael Bloomberg preparing to launch presidential campaign, US media reports say   -10%


Former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg is preparing to enter the crowded race to become the Democratic nominee for the 2020 presidential election, US media reported on Thursday.The 77-year-old is expected to file paperwork in at least one state this week declaring himself a candidate, according to multiple outlets including The New York Times.Bloomberg had said back in March he wouldn’t run, but has been toying for weeks with the idea of seeking the White House after all, according to an…


A Bloomberg Presidential Campaign Would Likely Be a Costly Folly   -25%

John Cassidy writes that the former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is unlikely to succeed if he decides to enter the race for the 2020 Democratic Presidential nomination.


Former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick laying groundwork for Democratic presidential bid, sources say  


Patrick is the second prospective candidate in recent days to announce a renewed interest in a presidential bid after waving one off; former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said last week that he, too, was considering running after ruling it out months before.


Four takeaways from Tom Steyer's CNN town hall   45%


Businessman Tom Steyer began his Sunday CNN night town hall in Iowa by challenging fellow billionaire Michael Bloomberg, who appears poised to join the Democratic presidential primary, to support a wealth tax.


'You have to earn votes and not buy them': Some 2020 Dems wary of Michael Bloomberg's potential bid  


Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar on Sunday joined others vying for the party's nomination in taking issue with Michael Bloomberg's potential 2020 bid and criticizing the former New York City mayor's billionaire status.


Dem 2020 candidate skipped Iowa. See how Iowans reacted   22%


Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has entered his name in the race for the Democratic primary in more than one state, but Iowa isn't one. CNN's Jessica Dean reports on how Iowans are reacting to Bloomberg skipping the first major contest of the Democratic primary.


Deval Patrick, Ex-Governor of Massachusetts, Is Considering 2020 Presidential Race   45%


Days after Michael Bloomberg began taking steps to enter the 2020 race, Mr. Patrick’s conversations with top Democrats are the latest evidence of an unsettled presidential primary field.


Bloomberg for President? No Way, His Successor Says  


Mayor Bill de Blasio portrayed Michael Bloomberg as out of touch with Democratic values: “a billionaire who epitomizes the status quo.”


Why N.Y.C. Mayors Have White House Dreams (and Voters Dash Them)   16%


Michael Bloomberg is the most recent former New York leader to mount or explore a presidential bid.


Former NY mayor Bloomberg set for eleventh-hour bid in 2020 US Presidential race   37%

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is strongly considering entering the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, a move that could greatly disrupt the field just three months before the first nominating contests.